Archive for Robert Heinlein

Close Up: The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag

Posted in 1959, Close Up with tags , , on February 5, 2009 by Aaron

closeupRobert Heinlein
1959

As I mentioned, I received this book earlier this week.  I kind of intimated that there were a couple of things bugging me about it.  And there are.  I guess I was unfair to introduce it as “The Unpleasant Impression of Jonathan Hoag” in that post.  This is a Heinlein 1st edition and it is in great condition.  That’s my layman’s description.  In terms of grading I am not sure how to place this, my first impression was Fine, but I think perhaps the couple of issues I’ll highlight might send it down to Near Fine.  Lets step through and check it out.

All good so far, what a lovely clean cover.  Beautiful.  Well protected by a Brodart dust jacket cover too…  But wait what’s that??  Lets have a closer inspection.

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A nasty little patch worn on the cover.  Thankfully it hasn’t made it all the way through.  So, if we open it what do we see??  Oh, my goodness…

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Price-clipped.  After the initial impression (I hadn’t noticed the small wear point on the cover then) I was somewhat deflated to see it had been chopped.  The seller, Jean, didn’t mention this little point in the auction.  In all fairness I didn’t ask any questions either.  Small lesson learned: Always ask pertinent questions such as “Has it been price-clipped?”  You will also notice a bit of what looks like foxing down the inner edge there too.  The other thing that jumped out at me at this point was this:

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Mr Bruce B. Tinkel has stamped his name nicely into the book.  Well, at least he didn’t scrawl it in there with a magic marker or something.  I’ll add this to the list of questions to remember to ask in an auction.  OK, so if we look a little closer at the spine what do we see.

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Nice.  Sits nice and square and the top and bottom of the spine look great.  You can see the dust jacket is superb here, so often focal points for wear and tearing.

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I love the boards on this book, nicely embossed in three colours.  Cool.  The back of the dust jacket is nice and clean also.

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Remember I mentioned that I have irrefutable evidence that this book has never been read??  How can I know this??  Check this out:

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Between pages 18 and 19 the bottom edges are still attached to each other!!  Either the trimming process was  a little inaccurate or more likely the binding process was.  Now, I don’t know about you, but I think it would certainly be a major inconvenience to read this book and maintain this situation.  Especially over a 50 year period.  You can also see the text block is darkened as is typical for the later GP books.

Actually, after consideration I wasn’t too concerned about the price-clipping.  As far as I know, Gnome never released a BCE edition of this book.  I’m pretty sure the Gnome Press book club (called the Fantasy Book Club) was dead by the time this book was published.

I’ve been in regular contact lately with Jean whom I bought this off – there are a couple more Gnome Press books winging my way.  Many thanks Jean, I certainly appreciate this Heinlein, it’s the star of my collection thus far.

Year: 1959
Paid: $210
Art: W.I. Van der Poel
Quantity: 5000
Binding: Tan-olive cloth with three-color title embossing.
GP Edition Notes: 1st edition so stated on the copyright page.
Comments: Great shape. I think this would be Fine if not for the flaws I’ve highlighted. I would appreciate input from anyone who might advise me otherwise or have any comments about this book.
Expand Upon: wikipedia.com, Internet Speculative Fiction Database

condition

The Unpleasant Impression of Jonathan Hoag

Posted in New Arrivals with tags , , on February 1, 2009 by Aaron

I arrived here at work today, first day of the week, first official day of the school year (no classes yet, they come at the end of February – this is graduation week for last years third graders), and I was an hour an a half late.  Actually the traffic was really bad this morning so I spent longer that usual on the bus.  The fact that I was very tired and hung over after retiring at about 4am this morning was also a contributing factor. Still, it was a bright start to my day when I saw a nice box addressed to me.  I knew what was in it because the name of the sender clued me.  I delayed opening it for about a half hour or so.  You know, just to build the anticipation and excitement.  Within lay The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag by Robert Heinlein.  A Heinlein first edition was actually in my hands!!  I don’t know about you, but this gets me excited.  Beautiful condition too… but I’m getting carried away here.  To cut a long story short, there were a couple of unfortunate surprises.  I’m going to do a photo review of this book in the next day or so, so keep this channel of the hyper-spatial relay open, as you might in the Foundation universe. Oh, The Crotchety Old Fan gave me a nice little mention in his blog.  Thanks Steve.

Been back almost a week…

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on January 22, 2009 by Aaron

…and I’m busy.  I brought my eldest daughter Sonja over to Korea with me for a vacation.  She finished high school last year and this is a kind of gift for her for finishing 7th form and and an experience she will hopefully take a lot away from before she starts her degree in February.  Consequently my activity on the GP front has been a little meager lately.  HOWEVER.  I scored The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag off eBay a couple of days ago.  My very first Robert Heinlein 1st edition.  Boy, am I excited about receiving that.  From what I could see on eBay, it looked in Near Fine condition too.  Also,  the very nice man Geoff Robson whom I got Sands of Mars off had a couple of other “Gnomes hiding in his bookshelf” (I have to credit Geoff with that witicism..).  Agent of Vega by James H. Schmitz and The Vortex Blaster by  Edward E. Smith, PhD. are on their way to me along with ‘Sands’.  Thank you very much Geoff.  Actually, I must get down to work to see if they have arrived already.